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HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
U.S. Geological Survey

Friday, June 10, 2016 6:30 AM HST

KILAUEA VOLCANO
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)

Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Activity Summary: Eruptions continue at Kīlauea Volcano’s summit and East Rift Zone. The summit lava lake remains relatively high, its level fluctuating slightly with changes in summit tilt. Lava continues to advance southeast from Puʻu ʻŌʻō and currently poses no threat to nearby communities. The June 27th lava flow northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō appears to be inactive.

Summit Observations: Deflationary tilt switched back to inflationary tilt before sunrise this morning, as expected for a DI event. The broader deformation trend recorded by summit tiltmeters over the past few weeks has been one of gradual inflationary tilt. The summit lava lake remains relatively high, though its level varies in response to inflation and deflation. Rates of seismicity are at background levels, with episodes of tremor associated with periods of spattering within the Overlook vent. Sulfur dioxide emissions from the summit vent over the past week ranged from 4,200 to 4,700 metric tons/day during good trade wind conditions. Data from GPS networks and InSAR (satellite radar) show continued long-term inflation of the summit and upper Southwest Rift Zone magma reservoirs.

Puʻu ʻŌʻō Observations: The tiltmeter at Puʻu ʻŌʻō continues to record slow, gradual deflationary tilt. Subsidence of the crater floor was not apparent in webcam images, though it may be too slight to be perceptible over the span of a single day. Seismicity is at background levels, and the sulfur dioxide emission rate from all East Rift Zone vents was about 410 metric tons/day when last measurable on June 1.

Lava Flow Observations: Webcams overnight saw no incandescence northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, supporting the possibility that the June 27th flow is no longer active. HVO scientists will continue to watch this area over the coming days – the more time that passes without active lava in this part of the flow field, the more likely it is that the supply of fresh lava to the June 27th flow has ceased. The flow from the east flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō remains active and continues to advance southeast. The flow was 2.7 km (1.7 mi) long when mapped on June 8.
This small-scale map shows Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow field in relation to the eastern part of the Island of Hawaiʻi. The new breakouts from Puʻu ʻŌʻō that began on May 24 are shown in red, as mapped on May 25. The area of the original June 27th lava flow field is shown in pink, as last mapped in detail on May 9. Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows erupted prior to June 27, 2014, are shown in gray. The black box shows the extent of the accompanying large scale map.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. The base map is a partly transparent regional land cover map from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Office of Coastal Management draped over a 1983 10-m digital elevation model (DEM). The bathymetry is also from NOAA.
In this thermal image of the northern breakout, the active lava channel and flow front are clearly revealed as bright yellow and pink colors. The channel that was active yesterday, but now stagnate, is visible as a bluish-purple line to the right of today's active flow.
This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow field. The area covered by the June 27th flow (which may be inactive) as of June 2 is shown in orange. The areas covered by the recent breakouts at Puʻu ʻŌʻō as of June 2 are shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the new breakouts as mapped on June 8 is shown in red. The northern breakout is inactive. Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows erupted prior to June 27, 2014, are shown in gray. Puʻu ʻŌʻō is at lower left.